COVID-19: Protecting Yourself and Your Family

To help you protect yourself and your loved ones, we’ve gathered the most important information and guidance on the coronavirus and COVID-19.

 

Tips

It’s still cold and flu season, and the same practices that stop the spread of these common illnesses are recommended.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick. 
  • Wash your hands with soap and water regularly for at least 20 seconds. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are also effective.
  • Try not to touch your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands. 
  • Stay home when you’re sick (except to get medical care). If your children are still in school or daycare, keep them home if they are sick.
  • Cough or sneeze into a tissue or your elbow. Wash your hands afterward. 
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • Get plenty of rest, drink plenty of fluids, eat healthy foods, and manage your stress.

And see additional guidance from the CDC and White House.

 

Masks

The CDC doesn’t currently recommend the use of masks for most people. Only people who are sick with COVID-19 and in some cases those who are caring for them should wear face masks. Kaiser Permanente facilities will provide masks to patients showing symptoms.

 

People at High Risk

For most people, COVID-19 symptoms are mild and go away on their own. But if you're over 65, have a weakened immune system, or have an underlying health condition, you have a higher risk of developing serious symptoms. It’s important you take additional precautions, including:

  • Avoid large groups — including concerts, conventions, sporting events, and social gatherings.
  • Avoid visiting health care facilities except to get medical care — for example, nursing homes, clinics, and hospitals.

If you have a cough and fever, please call us and we’ll make sure you get the care you need.

 

Emotional Wellness Support

 

The outbreak of the coronavirus and COVID-19 may be stressful for you and your family. Here are some resources to support your family’s mental health, including how to talk to children in a reassuring way.

 

 
 

 

 

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